‘Crazy’ and ‘terrifying’: Aussie farmer’s story of survival

The following is a guest post by The ABC’s Andrew Coates, who has spent much of his career covering Australia’s wildlife and the environment.

Read the full story:The first thing Andrew said when he arrived in Darwin to cover the Great Barrier Reef is: “I want to be here with you.”

And so he was.

For a while it seemed like the perfect place to work.

In the summer, the climate is perfect for the coral and algae growth and the fish that eat it, which are plentiful.

“I’ve been out here on the reef,” Andrew says, pointing out a vast, flat-bottomed lagoon on the western end of the reef.

“It’s amazing how much water there is, how big, and how good it’s going to be for corals and algae and other things.

It’s pretty amazing.”

The reef was one of the first things Andrew and his crew saw.

“They came in on a boat and we just sat on it, watching them swim around, listening to them,” Andrew remembers.

The reef, which sits on a coral reef and is covered in white and blue coral, is a fascinating landscape.

It looks like an empty sea, but the water is rich with life.

The Great Barrier is home to about one million fish.

“This is the one of those places where you can see it in the sky, but it’s just really, really, big,” Andrew explains.

“And then, you know, it’s all around you, you see this little little dot that’s really just a dot and you see all these little dots and dots and dot again and again.”

“You can see this huge cloud coming out of it.

It has all the colours of the rainbow,” Andrew adds.

The Great Barrier reef has become something of a tourist attraction in Australia and it is one of only a few places on the planet that can boast of a living coral reef.

But Andrew and the crew have seen it for what it is: a wild and wild place, a place where life thrives, a beautiful place.

“We’ve had this little thing on our property, we’ve seen it all over,” Andrew recalls.

“We’ve been here, we saw it, we’re still here.”

Andrew says it’s a place of peace, a safe place, an ideal place to live.

It is not always safe, but he says the people in his community have always done everything in their power to keep it that way.

“When I say people, I mean, we all have our own personal challenges, but we’re a family,” Andrew continues.

“There’s always been a sense of community.

And we’ve never felt like we were under threat.”

When Andrew first arrived in the Great Wall, he was working at the local supermarket, where he had worked for many years.

But soon after arriving, he began to hear stories of how wildlife had been impacted by the Great River, a large, wide-body river that flows through the region.

“You could just hear it coming down the river, all the time, and it was just absolutely horrendous,” Andrew recalled.

“So, that was a big wake-up call.”

Andrew said the river was “absolutely devastating” and that he had heard stories of people having to go on the water in boats because of the river’s power.

“It’s very, very loud,” Andrew said.

Andrew’s work at the supermarket had not been long before the Great Rift, an area of the Great Australian Bight, which runs from New South Wales north to Victoria, created a large barrier of debris that was too heavy to move.””

The people on the river are literally being killed by the river.”

Andrew’s work at the supermarket had not been long before the Great Rift, an area of the Great Australian Bight, which runs from New South Wales north to Victoria, created a large barrier of debris that was too heavy to move.

“A lot of people in the community had to come up with a way to get across that river,” Andrew explained.

As Andrew was putting together his raft, he heard a loud bang. “

And, yeah, we actually got to see it go across the river and get into a small boat.”

As Andrew was putting together his raft, he heard a loud bang.

“I looked out, I was just like, ‘That’s the noise.

The river’s gone.'””

And it was in a few minutes.

It was about 2.45pm, the river had passed, and we were all just panicking.

We all got down on the deck and went back in, and I started looking for people, and there were some in the paddocks.”

Andrew was able to find a group of friends who were able to take him on a canoe and he set off.

“They just started yelling out, ‘This is where it is, we got to get to the Great